Remote or Temporary FEMA or Department of Defense Sites

SREUS Energy founders were asked to develop a housing and utility system for blue tarp tent cities in Haiti where around 60,000 people live in impoverished circumstances. They have also visited sites in India where hundreds of thousands of people live day to day in the same conditions. The SREUS system can be used to build and support low income housing communities providing power, hot and cold water, sanitary sewer, and garbage disposal.

The SREUS team is also exploring grants from the Department of Defense for remote airfield and temporary deployment site utility services. There is also a clear market for SREUS when FEMA response systems move into a disaster area while traditional utilities are repaired.

Numbers Speak For Themselves

50 +
Military Bases in 70+ countries
80 +
Thousands of people living below acceptable conditions
20000000 +
Refugees in refugee centers worldwide
50 +
Military Bases in 70+ countries
,
80 +
Thousands of people living below acceptable conditions
,
20000000 +
Refugees in refugee centers worldwide
FUEL

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Well, in this instance, perhaps your trash could be your treasure… When it comes to producing power and clean water using the SREUS system, there are many fuels that can power it: 

Isopropyl, methyl, ethanol, as well as xylene, acetone and most other flammable solvents can be used as fuel.
Single layer and multi-layer cardboard can be used.
Fire clean up wood and production charcoal can be ground and used as fuel for the SREUS unit.
Coke is charcoal made from coal that is used in steel plants. Abandoned piles of coke from retired facilities can also serve as fuel.
Unrefined oil from wells or even oil spill water can be inserted as fuel.
Between each batch of milk or yogurt, the equipment must be cleaned. The wash down water ends up with fats, sugars, and proteins that make useful SREUS fuels.
Diesel fuel, spilled diesel, off-spec, high sulfur, biodiesel, and vegetable oils of all kinds can be used as fuel for the SREUS unit.
Typically from food plants, cut-off ends, peelings, seeds, pits, damaged or rotting food, and anything that goes down a garbage disposal can be recycled as SREUS fuel.
Wheat, corn, oats, or many seeds that are spoiled, wet, or dry can be fed through the reactor as fuel.
Grass clippings, tree trimmings, leaves, old hay, straw, weeds, and invasive plant species are great fuel options.
High sulfur coal has been a major source of pollution and acid rain. Stockpiles of high sulfur coal can be run through SREUS with zero acid rain emissions.
Soybean, dried bean, or dried pea pods can all be used as fuel.
Horse and cow manure, including feedlot and dairy manure, are great SREUS fuels.
Either filtered or raw natural gas can be inserted as fuel.
Shells from peanut, almond, walnut, and coconut husks all can be used as fuel for power.
This is water that comes up when drilling for oil, usually about 3x water to oil. SREUS units can purify this previously contaminated water, producing power as a bonus.
Paper fiber, newspaper, mail, and adds are all viable fuel options.
Plastic garbage or recycling rejects, polyethylene, polypropylene, milk jugs, plastic bottles, grocery bags, and even baby diapers can act as non-toxic fuel for a SREUS unit.
Some food processes leave behind sugars, starches, fats, and proteins. Nearly all of these can be fuel for a SREUS unit.
Yes, even post-flush waste can be used.
Sewer gas is methane that comes off of decomposing sewage water. Captured sewer gas could also be used as fuel.
Sour gas is unfiltered methane with sulfur which causes acid rain when burned. SREUS units prevent the sulfur from contaminating the atmosphere.
Sludges that develop in the bottom of crude oil storage tanks as well as many other storage tanks provide excellent fuel.
Liquid and solid waxes can be used as fuel to make energy.
Sawdust, wood fibers, sticks, twigs, and shredded stumps are great SREUS fuels.