Food Processing Industry

  • food processing plants and industrial bakeries

With thirty thousand food processing plants and industrial bakeries across the US, there is a staggering amount of food waste, shells, hulls, cobs, renderings, fats, trimmings, etc. that are produced and disposed of daily. In addition, there is significant tonnage of food that spoils before or even after processing. In addition, these plants always have clean-in-place and washdown systems that produce significant amounts of wastewater with bio-matter as well as soap and solvent contaminants. Most sewer districts require impressive fees for treating this contaminated wash down water. A food processing plant in Salt Lake City, makes ice cream, cottage cheese, firm cheese and other dairy products from raw milk. They pay around $17,000 monthly to dispose of wastewater. With the BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) in their water they could power their facility, heat the sterilized wash down water, and recycle a significant portion of sewer water, eliminating or drastically reducing the cost from the sewer district and the need for freshwater. They could likely even sell back power on the grid to offset costs for other parts of their facility’s operations.

Numbers Speak For Themselves

$ 0
Costs in Waste Water
0
US Food Processing Plants
$ 500000 +
Potential Annual Savings
$ 0
Costs in Waste Water
,
0
US Food Processing Plants
,
$ 500000 +
Potential Annual Savings
FUEL

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Well, in this instance, perhaps your trash could be your treasure… When it comes to producing power and clean water using the SREUS system, there are many fuels that can power it: 

Single layer and multi-layer cardboard can be used.
Between each batch of milk or yogurt, the equipment must be cleaned. The wash down water ends up with fats, sugars, and proteins that make useful SREUS fuels.
Typically from food plants, cut-off ends, peelings, seeds, pits, damaged or rotting food, and anything that goes down a garbage disposal can be recycled as SREUS fuel.
Wheat, corn, oats, or many seeds that are spoiled, wet, or dry can be fed through the reactor as fuel.
Soybean, dried bean, or dried pea pods can all be used as fuel.
Either filtered or raw natural gas can be inserted as fuel.
Shells from peanut, almond, walnut, and coconut husks all can be used as fuel for power.
Paper fiber, newspaper, mail, and adds are all viable fuel options.
Plastic garbage or recycling rejects, polyethylene, polypropylene, milk jugs, plastic bottles, grocery bags, and even baby diapers can act as non-toxic fuel for a SREUS unit.