New Housing Subdivision Starts

With more than a 1.5 million new housing starts per year, (and more needed to keep up with houses that need to be “retired”) SREUS systems has an interesting potential to play a role in new subdivisions that are on the edge of existing utilities. Land outside of utility service is typically less expensive, however, the cost of extending utilities to these new areas can be prohibitively costly. SREUS can provide quick access to full utility services at competitive prices to these rural housing startups.

norway, fjord, river

Numbers Speak For Themselves

200000
New Housing Subdivision Development starts in 2019
200000
Permanently lost housing units in the U.S each year
2000000
U.S. Housing units below what is needed to match long-term demand
200000
New Housing Subdivision Development starts in 2019
,
200000
Permanently lost housing units in the U.S each year
,
2000000
U.S. Housing units below what is needed to match long-term demand
FUEL

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Well, in this instance, perhaps your trash could be your treasure… When it comes to producing power and clean water using the SREUS system, there are many fuels that can power it: 

Single layer and multi-layer cardboard can be used.
Diesel fuel, spilled diesel, off-spec, high sulfur, biodiesel, and vegetable oils of all kinds can be used as fuel for the SREUS unit.
Typically from food plants, cut-off ends, peelings, seeds, pits, damaged or rotting food, and anything that goes down a garbage disposal can be recycled as SREUS fuel.
Grass clippings, tree trimmings, leaves, old hay, straw, weeds, and invasive plant species are great fuel options.
Either filtered or raw natural gas can be inserted as fuel.
Paper fiber, newspaper, mail, and adds are all viable fuel options.
Plastic garbage or recycling rejects, polyethylene, polypropylene, milk jugs, plastic bottles, grocery bags, and even baby diapers can act as non-toxic fuel for a SREUS unit.
Yes, even post-flush waste can be used.
Sewer gas is methane that comes off of decomposing sewage water. Captured sewer gas could also be used as fuel.
Sawdust, wood fibers, sticks, twigs, and shredded stumps are great SREUS fuels.